What Does Screening Mean to You?

We asked young adults with diabetes (and our allies without diabetes!) a very important question: What does screening for type 1 diabetes mean to you? Here’s what they said.

July 10, 2024

It provides me more of a sense of control for my future children, knowing that they won’t have to go through DKA like I did to find out they have diabetes. I think it also provides a deeper sense of safety for the general public, knowing that they too can have a sense of understanding of them having diabetes without having to go through the extreme situation of DKA.
-Elisa

I was diagnosed with T1D following a hospitalization for DKA, which led to numerous complications and a five-day hospital stay. With better screening efforts, patients could avoid the severe complications I experienced and have the opportunity to gradually learn to manage T1D before reaching the more advanced stages of T1D.
-Bavly

Screening means knowledge and the power that comes with it. This is a new part of the field, and that means there is less data to make decisions with, but that only speaks to how much the research needs to happen and the screening needs to be done.
-Thomas

“If there would have been screening before my diagnosis, I wouldn't have gone into DKA, which if prevented, can tack years onto someone's life. I could have also enrolled in clinical trials to help prevent onset and learn/mentally prepare what life will look like with T1D.”

Screening for type 1 diabetes means I can live comfortably knowing that one day when I want to start a family that there are resources out there to get screened and prepare for T1D. If there would have been screening before my diagnosis, I wouldn’t have gone into DKA, which if prevented, can tack years onto someone’s life. I could have also enrolled in clinical trials to help prevent onset and learn/mentally prepare what life will look like with T1D.
-Caterra

T1D screening means a future where we don’t have children and young adults in the hospital with DKA as their introduction to diabetes. It means a future with less trauma, more education, and more empowered individuals with diabetes.
-Cameron

Screening is so important as someone who wants to be a Pediatric Endocrinologist that will see those who are diagnosed with T1D. My future patients would be much happier people if they had a significantly less stressful diagnosis because they got screened early.
-Elizabeth

Screening for type 1 means having the knowledge, power, and autonomy to control one’s own health. It opens up new and innovative technologies, trials, and medications as possibilities and allows for better education and preparedness prior to clinical onset. Screening could have allowed me and my family the time necessary to come to terms with my status and prepare for the future.
-Anonymous young adult

Screening is going to be huge in terms of finding who has T1D–or is at risk–and getting them the correct resources way sooner than ever before. In the long run, screening will reduce the costs related to T1D and potentially the complications, especially if disease modifying therapeutics can be administered earlier in the disease progression.
-Parth

As an individual without type 1 diabetes, screening for T1D to me means being proactive about my health management. Since T1D can strike anyone, regardless of family history, it’s a way to gain peace of mind or get prepared for potential future management.
-Keya

“ So many factors are at play here-- education to healthcare providers, cost to implement screenings, and awareness around why it is important for the general population which really show how misunderstood T1D is in the healthcare space but why it shouldn't be that way.”

I think screening for T1D is the key to eliminating T1D in the future for good because in a perfect world, if everyone were to have the ability to get screened from a young age, those with any antibodies can be given the future therapeutics to prevent T1D from occurring. This is currently the future with many exciting drugs being invented with the possibility to delay or fully stop the stages of development of T1D. As I study health policy I am passionate about breaking away barriers towards T1D needs in the healthcare space and screening is a great example. So many factors are at play here– education to healthcare providers, cost to implement screenings, and awareness around why it is important for the general population which really show how misunderstood T1D is in the healthcare space but why it shouldn’t be that way.
-Anonymous

And what about you…how do you think screening for T1D could be a game changer?

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